Rosa canina

dog rose hedging (shrub) - 25 plants - 30-40cm

25 plants - 30-40cm
pot size guide
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  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well drained soils, but tolerant of most
  • Rate of growth: fast
  • Flowering period: July to August
  • Flower colour: white with a pink flush
  • Other features: attractive red hips in autumn
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    The Royal Horticultural Society bare root hedging range is a very low cost way of planting a hedge. The bare root plants are only available to buy and plant when dormant. (November-March) These plants, with known seed provenence, are grown in 220 acres of rich Herefordshire soil. As they are dispatched directly from the fields, rather than through a nursery, they are much fresher than imported or even stored plants. RHS bare root plants are grown through low input horticultural methods. Plants are rotated with pigs annually, to improve soil condition. Water is harvested in the winter for use in the summer. No heat or polytunnels are used and, as the plants are dispatched direct from the fields, transport is kept to a minimum.

    Tough, tolerant and fast growing, the sprawling stems of this native rose will form a thick impenetrable hedge in record time. The pink-flushed, white flowers have a lovely scent and appear throughout summer. As they fade, glossy red fruits (hips) form, which add interest well into autumn. A wonderful addition to a wildlife-friendly garden as the hips are very attractive to birds. The prickly stems however will make unwanted visitors think twice before they try to cross. Happy and undemanding in most settings, it is particularly useful in coastal areas.

  • Garden care: For best results, plant them out as soon as they arrive into well prepared soil. As the flowers appear on stems that have grown in the previous year, pruning should be kept to an absolute minimum if you are growing them for a good display of flowers and hips. To keep it looking fresh though, you can cut back a couple of the older stems to around 30cm above ground level, from late autumn to early spring.

Please note that as we grow the hedging especially for you, we need to take full payment when you place your order so as to reserve stock for you. The bareroot plants will then be despatched to you during November.

As most shrub roses tend to flowers best on older stems, they only need a little light formative pruning. Hard pruning should be avoided unless absolutely necessary as it can often ruin the plants shape. The best time to prune is in late summer after they have finished flowering. While wearing tough gloves, remove dead, damaged, diseased or congested branches completely. If the centre of the shrub is becoming congested, remove one or two of the older stems to their base. If they have become too leggy, then you can often encourage new growth to form by cutting one or two stems back to within 10 - 15cm above ground level.

There are currently no 'goes well with' suggestions for this item.

 

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If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
4 Questions | 4 Answers
Displaying questions 1-4
  • Q:

    I would like to plant a dog rose hedge to attract to wildlife to my garden. Are these plants whips?
    Asked on 6/23/2014 by longlegslonghair from Dunstable

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Yes, these hedging plants are sold as bare-root whips during the colder months of the year.

      Answered on 6/26/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    We are considering a dog-rose hedge - is it best to plant this in spring or autumn?
    Asked on 3/14/2014 by Bosley from London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      These bareroot plants are only available from November to March when they are dormant, so they can be planted happily between these months.

      Answered on 3/17/2014 by Anonymous from Crocus
  • Q:

    Hello. We are thinking of using dog roses for a hedge but do not want a high one. Is there a variety that grows no more than say three feet. If not, can they be successfully pruned to stay low. Thank you
    Asked on 10/16/2013 by Pammie from Seaford

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      Rosa canina can grow easily up to 2m x 2m, - they can be pruned but as most shrub roses tend to flower best on the older stems, if you prune them hard you will loose the flowers, so normally you would only prune to keep in them shape. I'm afraid there isn't a smaller dog rose that I know of.
      Sorry I can't help you more this time

      Answered on 10/17/2013 by Anonymous from Crocus
  • Q:

    Hedging and Osmanthus plants

    Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane
    Asked on 11/29/2009 by Janey Mitch

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-4

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