Philadelphus 'Belle Etoile'

mock orange

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£11.99 Buy
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A restrained philadelphus ( reaching man-height) with large white flowers splashed in maroon-purple - deliciously fragrant and deliciously fresh

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June and July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    In June and July this lovely mock orange is smothered with highly fragrant, single, cup-shaped flowers with distinctive splashes of purple at the centre. The delicious orange-blossom fragrance floats on the breeze on warm summer evenings. This compact variety produces abundant, gorgeous, bridal-white flowers set off perfectly by oval, deep green leaves. This is an essential, low-maintenance shrub for a sunny mixed border, and it can also cope with poor soil, urban pollution and salt-laden air.

  • Garden care: Mulch around the roots in spring with a deep layer of well-rotted garden compost or manure. Prune in late summer, immediately after flowering, removing one in four of the older stems to ground level.

Digitalis purpurea f. albiflora

foxglove

Elegant, white flowers on tall stems

£7.99 Buy

Clematis armandii

clematis (group 1)

Fantastic evergreen climber

£14.99 Buy

Betula utilis var. jacquemontii

west Himalayan birch

Brilliantly creamy-white bark

£49.99 Buy

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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CrocusPhiladelphus'Belle Etoile'
 
5.0

(based on 1 review)

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Reviewed by 1 customer

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(4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Highly recommend this product

By BETSY

from LONDON

Pros

  • Attractive
  • Fragrant
  • Hardy
  • Healthy

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Patio

    Comments about Crocus Philadelphus'Belle Etoile':

    I've absolutely fallen in love with this plant. It's just so pretty, the flowers are gorgeous white with a mauve centre and the scent is just heaven. The foilage is lovely and healthy. I will probably plant it out in the garden for next year and give it the space it deserves.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Keen but clueless

    Comment on this review

     

    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    3 Questions | 3 Answers
    Displaying questions 1-3
    • Q:

      Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub....

      Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret
      Asked on 12/5/2009 by D DRAKETT

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      Plant help with Camellia pruning, bugs on our Acer, Cornus not growing and our Philadelphus still not flowering!

      I have some queries regarding a few plants purchased from Crocus which I'm hoping you can help me with. This year we purchased "Camellia ?? williamsii 'Debbie'" and it seems to be growing nicely already, however it's very straggly, it arrived with two stems tied to a cane. The stems have continues to grow, and it's now tied to a longer cane, but it's showing no signs of bushing out. Will it do this with more time or do we need to start pruning to encourage it? We also bought "Cornus alba 'Sibirica'(red-barked dogwood)" and have it in a nice sunny position. It's lost its leaves for the winter and the stems are lovely, but it hasn't grown at all since we bought it (in June). Is this normal or do I need to do anything specific to help it along? We bought a Japanese Maple "(Acer palmatum var. dissectum Atropurpureum Group)" a few years ago but has recently become infested with some kind of beetle. We didn't notice anything, until we were moving the tub at the weekend and found the tree, soil and side of the pot coated in little grey/brown beetles slightly bigger than aphids. I've sprayed it with a pesticide which seems to have killed them, but I'm wondering what they were and what if anything can be done to ensure they don't come back, preferably without having to keep coating it with pesticides. Finally, we also bought a Mock Orange (Philadelphus Manteau d'Hermine). We originally had it in a tub, where it grew at an enormous rate, but it had no flowers. This year it seemed to be pot-bound, so we transplanted it into the garden, in a nice sunny position. It has continued to grow in both width and height, but to date has still had no flowers. Any suggestions? Thanks Mark
      Asked on 10/21/2009 by Anonymous

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello Mark, Young Camellias can be very variable in shape, and some pruning is often needed to encourage a balanced, bushy shape. If yours is long and thin, then you can encourage it to bush out by pinching out the growing tips and shorten over-long stems. Ideally this should be done in spring, after it has finished flowering but before the leaf buds break. As for the Cornus, it may simply be concentrating on putting on new root growth rather than top growth, or perhaps you have very heavy soil, which will slow growth down. You should not really be feeding many plants at this time of the year as you can do more harm than good by encouraging new growth at this time of the year. I would however expect to see some signs of growth in spring next year, at which point you can start feeding again. I am not really sure what insects you found on your Acer, but it may have been woodlice. These are completely harmless, but they do eat decaying organic matter such as leaves etc and they do like cool, damp spots to hide out in. Finally, there are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade, not enough water or nutrients, or pruning at the wrong time of the year. I am not really sure why yours has not produced buds, but you can often give them a bit of a push by feeding with a high potash fertiliser during the growing season. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 10/22/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      My Philadelphus doesn't flower

      Please could you offer some advice. Last year we bought two Philadelphus plants. We planted one in the tiny back garden and one in the front garden and both have grown quite vigorously. Our problem is that they have not flowered and still show no signs of doing so. Is there anything I can do to encourage flowering? Lynda and Arthur
      Asked on 6/22/2009 by Lynda Styles

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello there, There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade, not enough water or nutrients, or pruning at the wrong time of the year. It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers, which is quite common for things that have recenlty been planted. I am not really sure why yours has not produced buds, but you can often give them a bit of a push by feeding with a high potash fertiliser. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 6/22/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    Displaying questions 1-3

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