Hamamelis mollis

Chinese witch hazel

3 litre pot - 40cm
pot size guide
£29.99 Buy
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All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moderately-fertile, moist, well-drained neutral to acid soil
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing
  • Flowering period: December to February
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    In winter, this upright, deciduous shrub has clusters of sweetly scented, bright yellow, spidery flowers clinging to bare twigs. In autumn, the bright green leaves turn soft yellow. A beautiful shrub for a woodland edge, or winter border or alongside a path, where its fragrance can be appreciated. The flowering twigs can be cut to perfume rooms in winter.

  • Garden care: In early spring remove any misplaced, crossing or diseased branches and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted compost or manure around the base of the plant.

Helleborus × hybridus 'Harvington Shades of the Night'

Lenten rose / hellebore

Early spring flowers in shades of deep purple

£16.99 Buy

Hamamelis × intermedia 'Jelena'

witch hazel

Fiery orange, scented flowers in winter

£63.99 Buy

Amelanchier lamarckii

June berry

Superb autumn colour

£49.99 Buy

Cornus sanguinea 'Midwinter Fire'

dogwood

Flame-coloured winter stems

£11.99 Buy
 

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7 Questions | 7 Answers
Displaying questions 1-7
  • Q:

    How long would it take for a typical 40cm Hamamelis Mollis (3L pot) to grow into 1m-1.25m (12L pot) plant?
    Asked on 9/25/2014 by Trevor from Welwyn

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It is really difficult to be too specific as growth rates are largely determined by external factors such as soil type and the available water, light and nutrients. As a very rough estimate however, I would say around 5 years.

      Answered on 9/26/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Winter flowering shrubs and climbers to plant with new hedge

    Hello, I have newly planted a hedge (made up from Hornbeam, Rosa rugosa, Blackthorn, Cornus, Hawthorn and Hazel) about 50ft long. I have been told that if I was to plant amongst the hedge some winter flowering Clematis such as 'Wisley Cream' it would give some nice colour these bleak winter months when the hedge is bare of foliage. The hedge is south facing and although the ground is ???good??? heavy Cambridgeshire clay the hedge has been planted in a trench back filled with leaf mulch, chipped wood and spent peat. Although I have said about in-planting Clematis in the hedge, I am open to other plant suggestions if you have any. Regards Terry
    Asked on 12/31/2009 by Terry Allum

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub....

    Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret
    Asked on 12/5/2009 by D DRAKETT

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Hamamelis mollis-planting before we get frosts?

    Hi, I received a gift of a Hamamelis mollis during the third week of October from your company. I am still trying to design my new garden and would like advice on how long I can keep my Witch Hazel in the original pot. My garden is still being laid out as we have just completed extending and refurbishing our new home. Would I be right in thinking that I need to get the plant out of the existing pot before we get any frost? I am not a very experienced gardener but am desperate not to let the shrub die. Many thanks Hazel.
    Asked on 11/10/2009 by Hazel Shepherd

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Hazel, This plant is fully hardy so won't be affected by the cold weather. Ideally it should come out of its pots as soon as possible, but you can keep it in its pot until next spring as long as you make sure it is kept well watered. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/10/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Plants suitable for patio pots

    Hello I wanted to enquire if you have a Sarocococca hookeriana var. humilis, I looked online but it's not listed. I am askng for that particular plant, because I only have a patio and want plants that won't grow to an enormous size or require spectacular care. A rosemary and a dwarf syringa I bought from you are doing very well. Plants always arrive in very good condition which I really appreciate. A Myrtus communis subsp. 'Tarentina' which I potted up immediately in a larger pot suffered shock I think, - I wonder what you know about this myrtle? I am wanting to grow plants on a small patio in containers and wonder if the following plants are suitable:- Sarcococca hookeriana var. humilis (if you have got it) or a Sarcococca hookeriana digyna (which is in your listings). Winter Jasmine, or any of the other Jasmines, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia grandiflora but would this be too large for my patio- I am thinking of winter cheer with its red berries, and Nandina Domestica. Many thanks Bernadette
    Asked on 7/26/2009 by Bernadette Matthews

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Bernadette, I'm afraid we do not sell Sacrocococca hookeriana var. humilis, but the other two we list will be fine in a large pot as long as they are kept well fed and watered. It is my experience that most plants will cope if the pot is big enough and they are well looked after, however larger plants like the Jasminum nudiflorum, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia or Nandinas will eventually run out of steam and need to be placed into the garden. You should however be able to get a good few years from them. As for the Myrtus, I have not heard that they particularly dislike being moved, but as they are not fully hardy they need protection in winter. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 7/27/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    What plants would you suggest for a winter gift?

    I would like to send a present in November to someone who loves the garden - any suggestions as to what you could offer? (I previously sent one of your ornamental bay trees, which was very successful).
    Asked on 10/17/2006 by Jennifer Baldwin

    1 answer

  • Q:

    The Hamamelis we sell in a 2 or 3lt pot will be around 40cm tall, while those in a 12lt pot will be around 1-1.25m tall.
    Asked on 1/30/2005 by Crocus

    1 answer

    • A:

      Please can you advise on the height of the Chinese Witch Hazel when supplied?

      Answered on 1/31/2005 by Pegasus9963@aol.com
Displaying questions 1-7

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